The Science of Empyrion

Discussion in 'Role-playing' started by Vermillion, Sep 8, 2018.

  1. Vermillion

    Vermillion Captain

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    The Science of Empyrion

    Welcome to my new err... show, called "The Science of Empyrion." I'm here to attempt to explain the science behind the mechanics that govern the structure and function of Empyrion's items, machines and plantlife. So far, backstory is something the guys at Eleon haven't shared with us.
    I'll be tackling things like Erestrum, Sathium, Zascosium, Promethium and Pentaxid. Then on through generalized mechanics for certain machines as well as the biology of the local flora and fauna. I'll be laying it out like a wikipedia page too, so it's all neatly ordered and stuff. This RP section is basically empty, so I might as well fill it up.
    This section is more or less a big pile of BS. But it's bs more or less supported by real life physics with as little handwaving as possible. Don't go all emo on me because you vaguely remember something about alloys being unlisted elements in a science class you were sniffing glue through 20 years ago.
    Now, i'm not just gonna throw up a whole lotta handwavium to poorly bs my way through this and just make up nonsense terms. I'm basing the function and use of these things on how it's used in game, where you get it, and drawing parallels with real-life equivalents. Through the power of wikipedia and google I can easily fact-check and bs my way through complex quantum mechanics regarding material stress and radioactive half life decay.
    For example, i'm not gonna go around declaring that something like Sathium is an alloy, because proper alloys usually aren't found in nature. You don't go around mining up Stainless Steel, Bronze or Brass (alloys). Just as Mayonnaise doesn't come from a plant. If you think either of those things are true, please facedesk until you can no longer read this text.
    Today i'm here to tell you about Erestrum...



    Erestrum
    Appearance
    : Green-Gold Metallic Luster
    Group: 1 (Alkali Metals)
    Electron shell: 2, 8, 18, 25, 1, 1

    [​IMG]

    Erestrum is a unique neutron-heavy semi-stable isotope of chemical element Caesium (Cs) with an atomic number of 55. It is a soft, green-gold alkali metal of extra-solar origin with a melting point of 45.2°C (113.36°F / 318.35°K) and a boiling point of 411.5°C (772.2°F / 684.65°K). It's a ductile and soft metal possessing extreme electrical conductivity and high thermal conductivity coupled with moderate reactivity and high pyrophoricity.
    Despite being an isotope of Caesium and sharing several of Caesium's traits, the unnatural arrangement of Erestrum's electron shell, high neutron count and strong nuclear force has called it to be classified in a new group of elements (see neoelements) by many scientists. Though at present it remains officially listed as Caesium, it's often designated in commercial applications, scientific textbooks, experiments and documentation as element Em-55p, seperate from its parent element Cs-55.

    Occurence:
    First discovered by a Perseus explorative mining expedition led by scientist and geologist Doctor William Bennet in 2145 on the planet Eres III in the form of Erestrite, it has since become a staple component of high-output capacitors, reinforced electronics, power generation and thermal weaponry.
    Since 2180, Erestrum has been found on over 250 different planets in over 100 different star systems in mostly shallow deposits and in over 12 identifiable forms ranging from the most common Erestrite with a 60% Erestrum purity, to Pyrestrum with a 20% Erestrum purity. Large deposits of pure Erestrum have also been found in asteroids and meteorites in another 30 unrelated systems.
    Radioisotope dating has thus far revealed that the origins of Erestrum aren't quite as simple as most common elements; as all Erestrum seems to have originated from the same location, a trait shared by a number of similar recently discovered neoelements (see Rayet Collision Theory). The theory is reinforced by the fact that almost all terrestrial Erestrum deposits are located near the surface.

    Physical Properties:
    Erestrum is an isotope of Caesium. However, while it may share many traits it also differs in many areas.
    Erestrum is a ductile, faintly green-tinted gold-colored metal with a hardness of 0.5 on the Mohs scale. The presence of oxygen causes the formation of a green oxide layer of Em3O that's the cause of the vibrant green hue commonly associated with Erestrum. While pure erestrum has high thermal conductivity, the oxide layer is thermally resistant, preventing the transferrence of conducted heat. Often resulting in the eventual self-melting of the erestrum metal in temperate to hot environments and subsequent reformation of metallic erestrum.
    Erestrum's electrical conductivity is currently the highest of any known metal; even higher than silver, approaching the level of a superconductor. The oxide layer is also highly conductive, but due to the difference in electric resistance between the metal and the oxide heat will eventually accrue leading to a meltdown.

    Chemical Properties:
    Erestrum is less reactive than Caesium and exhibits pyrophoric traits only under certain conditions. Due to the immediate formation of an insulating oxide layer on contact with oxygen it's difficult to get a violent reaction without dissolving Erestrum in a chemical solution to prevent the formation of an oxide layer while exaggerating the pyrophoric traits of Erestrum. It's by this method that Erestrum is used in the creation of high-temperature plasma for use in plasma generators and thermal weaponry.

    Applications:

    Alloying

    Erestrum's electrical conductivity makes it an ideal candidate for electronics and power conductance. However due to Erestrum's reactivity and low melting point, it's only viable in orbital satellites and space probes where temperature and reactivity aren't a factor.
    Because of this, Erestrum is usually alloyed with Zascosium. Combining Erestrum's high conductivity with Zascosium's hardness, reactivity and comparibly high melting point allowing the production of Zascosium Alloy: A strong, highly conductive red-gold colored alloy used in the production of high output capacitors, power coils in high end manufactories and catalysts in robust ion thrusters and fusion reactors.

    Erestrum Gel
    By exposing Erestrum to small amounts of liquid Hydrogen fluoride the erestrum bonds with it, lowering its melting point to below room temperature to produce Erestrum Gel, a dull viscous metallic fluid with a lime green hue.
    Erestrum gel is extremely reactive and possesses exaggerated pyrophoric qualities when exposed to oxygen and a considerably lower vaporization point. These traits make it the best possible candidate for plasma generation in both generators and plasma weapons technology by superheating the gel through induction, high-temperature explosives or directed energy lasers.
    When the gel reaches temperatures capable of vaporizing it into plasma, the bonded fluorine molecules are forcibly expelled in an exothermic reaction further heating the Erestrum into a plasma state; Gaining paramagnetic abilities of a ferrofluid making it possible to confine, suspend and propel the plasma using induced magnetic fields (see Railgun). When the magnetic field weakens to the point that the plasma can no longer be contained (such as impact with a physical object) the plasma is released; exploding violently as a superheated gas roughly 700 times its original volume then rapidly cooling as Erestrum vapor.
    The high thermal conductivity of the Erestrum plasma causes extreme thermal burns to exposed skin and the bright flash of a plasma detonation is known to commonly blind individuals near the impact site.

    Health and Safety hazards:
    While only slightly toxic in its pure metallic form. Erestrum is very harmful if ingested due to its reactivity to certain acids and the body's inability to break it down. It can melt with body heat and block airways and cause various internal problems.
    Due to Erestrum gel's high reactivity, it's classed as a hazardous material and requires licensing to both produce and use it commercially. Erestrum gel must be stored in a sealed container with an inert gas to reduce the chance of it reacting.
    Several Erestrum-bearing ores are also known to contain toxic elements such as Arsenic and Radon and care should be taken during the mining and processing to ensure that the ore is handled, stored and processed correctly.
     
    #1
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2018
  2. Paganizer

    Paganizer Commander

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    Awesome.. Hope we find some on Mars :)
     
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  3. geostar1024

    geostar1024 Rear Admiral

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    I've always thought Sathium was element 164; its density would make it useful for armor, and perhaps it has some interesting magnetic properties that make it suitable for flux coils that we haven't been able to model. Its density would also explain why we only find it in space; any on planets would have sunk into the core very early on.
     
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  4. Vermillion

    Vermillion Captain

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    Considering that the periodic table only goes up to 118, element 164 would be so heavy and radioactive its very presence on a planet would affect the environment... or lack of. I thought maybe it's a typo, but both elements 16 (sulfur) and 64 (gadolinium) would make terrible equivalents to sathium.
    Tungsten (74) or something like Molybdenum (42) would be better matches.
    Sathium is mostly found on planets anyway.
     
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    Last edited: Sep 9, 2018
  5. geostar1024

    geostar1024 Rear Admiral

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    Ah, I should have mentioned that I was looking at the extended periodic table (the wiki article is worth a quick read, just for the fun of it (the article itself could use some work, though)); if there are in fact islands of stability for superheavy nuclei, then 164 would be in the middle of one of them. This is all highly speculative, of course :).

    Also, I'd thought that sathium was only in asteroids by default; have I missed a terrain generation update?
     
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  6. Vermillion

    Vermillion Captain

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    Sathium is found on the same planets as Neodymium. Always found on ice and desert planets.
     
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  7. geostar1024

    geostar1024 Rear Admiral

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    Ah, fooey; there goes that idea :-/.
     
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  8. Vermillion

    Vermillion Captain

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    Sathium
    Appearance
    : Dark Gold Metallic Luster
    Group: 6B (Transition Metal: Neoelement)
    Electron shell: 2, 8, 16, 16, 1

    [​IMG]

    Sathium is a unique neutron-heavy stable isotope of chemical element Molybdenum (Mo) with an atomic number of Sa42. It is a dull gold metal with an unnaturally strong nuclear force, irregular electron arrangement and a denser configuration of neutrons, increasing the atomic weight of the isotope to almost double that of natural Molybdenum, surpassing Lanthanum(57) in mass.
    Sathium is officially classified as a Neoelement, existing in a new element group classification seperate from the rest of the periodic table. The configuration all Neoelements suggests that they were born from a collision between two superdense astral bodies (see Rayet Collision Theory) where lighter metals were fused into heavier ones under theoretical conditions briefly before stellar detonation sent the newly formed matter across the galaxy.
    Sathium is a fairly inert metal with a melting point of 2963°C (5365.4°F - 3236.15°K) and a Mohs hardness of 6.8; slightly softer than Tungsten, but at a lower weight. Sathium also exhibits a high attenuation coefficient equal to lead, making it ideal in radiation containment.
    Unlike other metals, Sathium readily mixes into strong alloys possessing high radiation resistance coupled with a high melting point.

    History:
    Sathium was first discovered by the Trainor Mining Company in 2167 on the frozen planet of Zolbrechyt, while mining for Iron. It was misidentified and processed as Tungsten due to its appearance, high mass and melting point and incorporated into containment shielding for an orbital particle accelerator in a neighboring system.
    During an attempt by the Orion Labs to synthesize new isotopes of Nobelium, it was discovered that the metal used in the containment chamber was made of a different make-up from the rest of the accelerator.
    Unfortunately the scientists involved with the project concluded that the change in the atomic structure was due to their experiments and proceeded to bankrupt the company over the next 5 years in an attempt to repeat their results.
    Sathium was eventually officially identified and named 3 years later by accountant Nani Mahal, when she was reviewing the company inventory during liquidation and discovered that the accelerator's shielding came from a different manufacturer and traced the origin of the materials back to Zolbrechyt. Where she spent her life savings to buy into the failing Trainor Mining Company (see Mahal Mining) and spent the next year overseeing the conversion from Hematite to Sathialite mining and processing.

    Physical Properties:
    Sathium is an isotope of Molybdenum. However, Sathium possess more qualities of Tungsten (W) than it does of its parent element Molybdenum; Sharing its low thermal expansion coefficient and reactiveness.

    Chemical Properties:
    Sathium is a transitional metal like Molybdenum, with the same electronegativity of 2.16 on the Pauling scale. Due to Sathium's resistance to heat and radiation, alloying it proves difficult using standard methods due to uneven heating and bonding between sathium and other metals. This issue is less of a problem with some metals than others.

    Applications:

    Alloying

    Since Sathium's official discovery it's been primarily used in the superalloys with normal terrestrial metals. For reasons still unknown, some alloys produced with Sathium are weaker or exhibit exaggerated traits than their component parts. For this reason sathium is primarily alloyed with steel to produce Sathium Steel (See Hardened steel).
    Like Tungsten, Sathium is also used to make metalloid ceramics like Sathium Carbide and Sathium Silicate. Whose primary uses are in Flux Coil Cores that are subject to extreme temperatures and high electrical resistance and high-stress bearings for industrial loaders.

    Hardened Glass
    Sathium is powdered and mixed with Silicon Powder and heated to produce a transparent sathium-reinforced hardened glass. The strength of hardened glass rivals that of diamonds, reaching a 9.5 on the Mohs scale, making it ideal for aerospace design and industrial machinery. Hardened glass is also known as Chain Glass due to the structure and arrangement of the sathium and silicon molecules being in long continuous interwoven chains allowing the glass to flex and bend somewhat without shattering as normal glass would.

    Hardened Steel
    Although considerably lighter than Tungsten alloys, Sathium Steel is still more than twice the weight of regular steel. Due to Sathium steel's resistance to radiation and temperature variations however, it easily replaces several centimeters of shielding normally required for spacecrafts to safely traverse space making it far more effective for spacecrafts than atmospheric aircrafts.


    Health and Safety hazards:
    Sathium dusts and fumes, generated by mining or metalworking, can be toxic, especially if ingested (including dust trapped in the sinuses and later swallowed). Low levels of prolonged exposure can cause irritation to the eyes and skin. Direct inhalation or ingestion of sathium should be avoided.
     
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  9. piddlefoot

    piddlefoot Rear Admiral

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    POP.

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    Dat was mar brain !



    Hey what about a megga detailed explain me for the Mod API ?
     
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  10. Neal

    Neal Rear Admiral

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    Nice!
    I really apprecitate the amount of thought that has been put into this.
    EGS needs TONS of this and a pile more on top it, to make it become alive.
    This is the stuff that makes the difference between just another pew pew game with goofy toy weapons and a game that has soul.
     
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  11. Bigfeet

    Bigfeet Captain

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    Impressive at first !
    But how would we bring info like this to the game ? Perhaps combining it with a tech research tree wich can be implemented at some point ?
    I see some usefull potential here. I like it !
     
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  12. Neal

    Neal Rear Admiral

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    Maybe once found, the ship computer could (automaticly) analyse it and store that data at a database in the ships (or personaly handheld) Computer.
    Or the data could be received if you sell the material to a trader.

    But i like the ship computer analysing stuff route more, since it could be done at some remote planet on your own.
    It adds to the "adventure" feel, if you don't have to run to some random lazy trader who is sitting on his butt all day, to tell you this.

    Maybe there could be some small minigame once you start analyzing material. The more points you archieve the more information you get. I think that could be neat.
     
    #12
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2019

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